Conversation


This section will include apps that support interactive conversation.


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tapsequence icon.jpg
TapSpeak Sequence
What: TapSpeak Sequence is a great program for creating multiple messages, such as ‘social scripts.’ Functions like a step-listing communication device:
• Unlimited # of sequences
• Unlimited sentence length and recording length
• Can use built-in icons (shapes, colors) for quick recording
• Can also add photos
• Many settings for tap & touch duration, extra movements allowed, and feedback
• Can add Dynavox / Mayer Johnson PCS core through an in-app purchase.
• Works with single switches

Who: I have used this app with:
a) People who use AAC, and are working on sharing stories
b) People who are struggling speakers

Where: I’ve used this in several settings, mostly small groups in classrooms for young students, at a community event, and in homes with individual students.

How: This app can be used for many purposes, such as:
• Jokes (greeting, do you want to hear a joke, are you ready, joke question, maintainer, joke answer, turn transfer).
• Social Stories (such as Carol Gray’s Social Stories: http://www.thegraycenter.org/social-stories )
• Conversational Scripts (such as those described by Musselwhite & Burkhart, in Can We Chat, www.aacintervention.com See samples in the April, 2006 Tip of the Month).
• Sharing Writing (e.g., student uses script to share a poem, story, etc.)
• Reminder Scripts (ex: listen to the steps for a recipe, or the parts of writing a story).
Single Messages! For example, we programmed ‘ing’ into a device for an Onset + Rime activity. Teacher calls out: I say /br/ and you say <points> and the student taps the iPad to say ‘ing’


Tip: Program in ‘landscape’ mode and use in ‘portrait mode!
Use colors as quick reference in setting up scripts. For example, I use:
• Green for greeting (ex: Yo! Excuse me.)
• Red for final message (ex: Well, gotta go. See you later.)
• Use photos to represent key items. For example, we used a Q & A to represent the Question & Answer in a joke script. We took a photo of the student’s book to represent the target of the Sharing Writing script.

Submitted by: Dr. Caroline Ramsey Musselwhite
Additional Ideas:
Value:
This app is a great value for the price, as you can record and SAVE unlimited numbers of social scripts.

tap sequence ex.jpg
$29.99
chow chat icon.jpg
Chow Chat
What: Chow Chat is described as ‘an engaging, educational app that brings the family closer while encouraging critical thinking, language development and the sharing of diverse ideas.’ Each ‘card’ presents a statement, then elicits conversation. The 366 topics for conversation are divided into three categories.


Quotes: Ex: ‘Life is like a box of chocolates. never know what you’re gonna get.’ What is the last thing that surprised you?

Proverbs: All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy. What are your favorite activities? Your least favorite?

Who: I have used this with students who use AAC, in a communication circle. Thus, friends of the young woman who uses AAC all used the questions to model using language on the device. We set this up so that the target student got a turn, then a peer, then the target student, etc. I have also used it with older students who are working on social communication.

Where: I’ve used this in classrooms (middle school) and community outing groups for people who use AAC.

How: This is completely straightforward. As with iTopics, I found that I had to ‘pick and choose’ which questions would be best. We were using a document camera to show the iPad. Students got to pick the category (Fun Facts, Quotes, Proverb), then I picked up the iPad, and swiped until I found a card that was appropriate for:
a) The setting
b) The ages
c) The language skills

Tip: This is a very flexible app! You can edit or add cards!
Edit A Card: For example, I edited one card just to make the language simpler. Another card, I edited so that students would need to give an open-ended answer, rather than yes / no.
Add A Card: You can add a card to take advantage of:
- Topics Your Students are Studying: For example, I added a fun fact about planets, then asked a question about space travel
- Topics That Interest Your Students: For example, you might add fun facts about sports (soccer, wrestling), fashion, pop stars, or anything else that your student is studying.

Submitted by: Dr. Caroline Ramsey Musselwhite
Additional Ideas:
Value:
This is not an app I use frequently, but it’s a great quick ‘space filler’ that focuses on supporting conversational skills in an engaging format. It is also FANTASTIC for sharing with families. I have not found any cards that are not ‘G-Rated’!

chow chat fun fact.jpg
$2.99
iTopics_Icon.jpg
iTopics

What: iTopics is basically a ‘parlour game’ that can be used to support struggling communicators. It provides a range of conversation starters in a range of categories. Samples that might be useful are:

About Me: If you could start your life over, what would you do again? Are you the same person on the inside as you are on the outside? Do you think more about the future or the past?

Animals: If you could own a pet dinosaur, what would it be? If you could be any animal, what would you be?

Fashion & Beauty: If you got a tattoo, what would you get and where would it be? What’s the best costume you’ve ever worn?

Imagination: If you could choose to live forever, would you? If you were stranded on a desert island, what would you do?


Who: I have used this with students who use AAC, in a communication circle. Thus, friends of the young woman who uses AAC all used the questions to model using language on the device. We set this up so that the target student got a turn, then a peer, then the target student, etc. I have also used it with older students who are working on social communication.

Where: I’ve used this in classrooms (middle school) and community outing groups for people who use AAC.

How: This is completely straightforward. I just found that I had to ‘pick and choose’ which questions would be best. We were using a document camera to show the iPad. Students got to pick the category (about me, animals, fashion & beauty), then I picked up the iPad, and swiped until I found a question that was appropriate for:
a) the setting
b) the ages
c) the language skills

Submitted by: Caroline Ramsey Musselwhite

Additional Ideas:

Value:
This is not an app I use frequently, but it’s a great quick ‘space filler’ that focuses on supporting conversational skills in an engaging format.

Tip: To make this a conversation, you often have to add the question, 'why' to each of their starters. In the example below, without the addition of 'why, students could have a single word answer.

itopics_screen2.jpg
$. $99
initiating.jpg
Initiating Social Skills HD
I have used this with students with Asperger’s and Austim to target the social behaviors and language needed to start a conversation and ask for help. This app provides a great way to introduce these concepts using videos and simple language. Then the program reviews each step in detail as you watch a video that demonstrates that particular skill or language structure. It stops after each step allowing for discussion of why that step is important. For example, discussing it is important to establish physical presence before initiating a conversation. It also allows for the student to watch the video again to look at facial expressions and environmental cues.
This app includes videos about starting conversations, introducing self, asking for help or assistance, give directions, join others in groups, apologize, give a compliment, and make a complaint.

Additional Ideas:
I love this app for older students and especially those with Asperger's or autism. It demonstrates the small nuances of social interaction in a video giving a visual referent. It also discusses the important nonverbal skills needed prior to the language needed to initiate different social interaction
$1.99
would you choose icon.jpg
Would You Choose
What: Would You Choose is basically a party game that offers two opposing choices, then uses a pie chart to show how others have responded to that question. It is divided into several categories:
Gross-out: Ex: Eat a grub every day for a year OR eat dead flies for the rest of your life.
Hilarious: Ex: Have a stupid name that everyone makes fun of OR have a mom who embarrasses you wherever you go
Thoughtful: Have curly hair OR straight hair
Bizarre: Have super strength OR have super speed

Who: I have used this with students who use AAC, in a communication circle. Thus, friends of the young woman who uses AAC all used the questions to model using language on the device. We set this up so that the target student got a turn, then a peer, then the target student, etc. I have also used it with older students and adults who are working on social communication.

Where: I’ve used this in classrooms (middle school) and community outing groups for people who use AAC.

How: This is completely straightforward. As with iTopics, I found that I had to ‘pick and choose’ which questions would be best. We were using a document camera to show the iPad. Students got to pick the category (Hilarious, Gross-Out, Thoughtful), then I picked up the iPad, and swiped until I found a card that was appropriate for:
a) The setting
b) The ages
c) The language skills

Tip: This tip is most appropriate for older students. Remember that you might have to ‘censor’ some of the questions! A fun feature is that you can submit your own questions, which would be an engaging group activity.

Submitted by: Dr. Caroline Ramsey Musselwhite
Additional Ideas:
Value:
This is not an app I use frequently, but it’s a good quick ‘space filler’ that focuses on supporting conversational skills in a fun format. I could see great value in using it to support compare / contrast, helping students to make their own (G-Rated!) questions.


would you choose sample.jpg
FREE