Grammar / Syntax


Entries into each section on this wiki will be structured so that this basic information is available. We will include the TITLE of the application, with a link to the broad description and rating on iTunes. The ICON is simply a screen shot of what will show up on the device. WHO describes the student you have used this particular app with. WHERE indicates whether the app was used at home, school, or in therapy. HOW describes the manner in which you used it. This is also the place to elaborate on other ideas for application. WHY/WHY NOT provides the contributer an opportunity to indicate the value of the app, whether they would use it again, and rationale for the opinion. We invite anyone else who has used the app to comment on anything about it... different whos, hows and whys....


ICON
TITLE
(WHAT)
APPLICATION
(WHO, WHERE, HOW)
VALUE
(WHY/WHY NOT)
COST
my_play_home_icon.jpg
My Play Home
What: My PlayHome is an delightful app for supporting vocabulary. Enter into a virtual house, with four rooms (living room, kitchen, bedroom, bathroom) and five characters (Mom, Dad, brother, sister, baby). In each room, many activities are possible. For example, in the living room, players can interact with: curtains, cat, CD player, TV, books, fish, lamp, clock, cat, and an apple! As with Cookie Doodle, as a SLP, I see language, language, language!!

Who: This app works so well with preschoolers (modeling vocabulary) through school age students (using their devices to direct actions, writing a memoir about what they did that day). Look for several reviews, under different categories (Sequencing, Grammar / Syntax, Following Directions). For this description, we’ll focus on vocabulary.
a. Action Words: this app is ideal for teaching a wide range of actions, from core actions (get, put, find, turn) to more subtle action words such as feed and jump
b. Nouns: This app includes a range of noun options, including categories of family members, food, furniture, appliances, toys, and small items such as shampoo.
c. Prepositions: A range of prepositions can be practiced including: on, in, under, over

Where: I’ve used this in several settings, mostly small groups at preschool and elementary schools; however, it’s also ideal as a home activity.

How: Basically, you just enter a room and start exploring. Each room has at least 15 items / actions to explore. Or, kick it up a notch!!

Here's how I used it to support practicing past tense.
1) First, I read the book Diary of a Baby Wombat by Jacquie French
2) We talked about diaries, telling about your day
3) Then each student chose a character (using the AAC device, of course), such as, I WANT TO BE THE MOM; I WILL BE THE BABY; LET ME BE THE BOY)
4) I told them to remember everything they did, because they would each need to write about it in their ‘diary’ at the end
5) Students had fun playing for about 3 minutes, then were asked to write what they had done (I JUMPED ON THE SOFA; I ATE AN APPLE; I DROPPED THE APPLE; I WENT TO THE BEDROOM AND PLAYED WITH THE BASKETBALL)

Submitted by: Dr. Caroline Ramsey Musselwhite

Additional ideas/comments from others:
This app so worth the bang for FREE! So much language for:
- speaking
- device practice
- writing
$2.99
GiantTimer_Icon.jpg
xxxxxxxxxxx
GiantTimer
What: This is exactly what its name implies . . . a giant timer! It can be used to count up or down.
Stopwatch Mode: Set it and it counts the time until you stop it
Timer Mode: Set the amount of time you want (ex: 2 minutes), and it will beep when that time has elapsed

This review tells how you might use it to support automaticity in syntax learning!

Who: This timer is helpful for anyone who knows numbers. It’s great for people who need to develop motor automaticity for any behavior, such as activating switches, locating language sequences, etc.
I also use it for professional development. "Okay guys, you have three minutes to think of messages for a treasure hunt. Ready, GO" (set it for Timer Mode).

How: The GiantTimer can be used to count up or count down. Examples:
Count Up: Set the stopwatch to see how long it takes the student to complete a task. Press pause, and you have a record of the time.
Count Down: Set the timer to encourage students to complete a task in less time. This could be done for a range of activities, such as:
• math problems
• motor acts

This app would be extremely helpful for people engaging in Precision Teaching:
Precision teaching is a precise and systematic method of evaluating instructional tactics and curricula. It is one of the few quantitative analyses of behavior forms of applied behavior analysis. (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Precision_teaching )

Here's an example of how I used it for middle school girls in a new Communication Circle. This included: 2 friends and the target student who uses an Eco communication device with head mouse. We rolled a cube to pick an auxiliary (helping) verb, and students used it in a question (Will I, Can he? Does she?) After they had learned the patterns (but were VERY slow!), we used the GiantTimer. I set it to 10 seconds for the peers - after a few trials, they increased their speed so they could 'beat the buzz' (respond in less than 10 seconds).

I suggested that the target student could have 20 seconds, but she wanted to use the same timing. Within several trials, she was able to create sequences such as Can I go? Did he do it? . . . in LESS than 10 seconds.

Note: If you use this app to increase speed of communication, PLEASE follow it immediately with an activity using authentic language! For example, after the activity described above, we played 'Gossip Girl', with each student sharing a fun (but nice) gossip with her friends. Samples were: Did he have it? Does he like me?

I found this app enormously helpful in supporting students in developing a quick motor pattern for locating icon sequences for messages.

Submitted by: Dr. Caroline Ramsey Musselwhite
Additional ideas/comments from others:


xxxxsentence_builder.pngxxxxx
xxxxxxxxxxx
Sentence Builder
xxxxxxxxxxxx
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
I used this app during a 1:1 home therapy session with a client who uses a Vantage Lite communication device. I used this app to target the pronouns “he”, “she”, and “it” as well as present progressive forms of verbs. The pictures were great with helping with understanding the difference between the pronouns and demonstrating verbs. I would read the three choices and have the client say the correct answer on the device and I would provide point cues to help her find the given words. At the end the client had the whole sentence on her device to listen to. I would make the sentence on the Ipad match, as it was difficult for the client to scroll to the right word. Then visual and sound feedback was provided for correct sentences. Generic statements, such as, “you will get it next time” were given for incorrect responses.
Submitted by: Lisa Gray
Additional ideas from others:
You can find some information and a video preview from
Apps for Children With Special Needs
http://a4cwsn.com/2011/01/sentence-builder/
I liked how it allowed the client to see how sentences are constructed pronoun/subject +verb+object and regarding a stimulus picture. It was nice to have the sentence constructed in the device to allow for the client to hear it if it was incorrect. The app does not read incorrect sentences, rather provides a generic statements such as “I know you’ll get it next time.” Not every sentence would target the structures I wanted to or sometimes the vocabulary was not in the device. It also only gave positive feedback on every other item. However, my client enjoyed it a lot and maintained interest in constructing sentences much longer than in any other activity tried!
zzzzz
$3.99
story_builder.JPG
Story Builder
This app is great to use with kids who are working on sentence formulation, generating ideas, inferential reasoning and sequencing. There are three different levels to work with.
I have been using this app with a 12 year old girl who uses an ECO14. Accessing is slow for her, so I liked the "fill in the blank" format. Level 1 was a great level for her to facilitate ideas. After she completed each page, she read the page out loud using her device and it was recorded. At the end of the activity, the book becomes "published," with the recording for each page played sequentially. The books can be emailed.
Submitted by: Patty Ashby
Additional ideas from others:
I do wish the pictures were more interesting. Overall, definitely worth 4 dollars!
It would be great if the app wrote out the sentence the student formulated. It is only recorded.
$3.99
typoinsta2.png
TypoInsta
This app is great way to enhance pictures and write about them. I used this app during a 1:1 therapy session where we were targeting "he", "she", and "they" with progressive forms of verbs. We took pictures of pictures I had that could be put together to generate a story. After taking the pictures, I transcribed what the student said onto the picture. The student enjoyed choosing the color and taking the pictures. We plan on using it again with picture of the client and friends doing daily routines to make it further engaging since we discovered you can take pictures from the camera roll and type on them. This app could also be useful when writing short descriptive poems about a singular picture.
Submitted by: Lisa Gray, M.S. CCC-SLP
Additional ideas from others:
It was difficulty for longer sentences, as the text did not wrap and would cut off. Also, we were unable to string our pictures together to create a story. Overall, it's a pretty simple and one more way to enhance the engagement of clients in therapy! Best of all its free!
Free
my little town.jpg
**Toddler’s Seek & Find Picture Book:**

**My Little Town**
What: This app is a visual scene with dozens of actions to activate. There is a feature called "whats up" where you click on the picture in a choice board format and it activates that picture back in the scene.

Who: This app and the related app My Animals works well with preschools and toddlers with emerging fine motor finger isolation. I have used it to work on reaching around the screen and following directions of find the ….
It has also been useful to work on commenting for children with their signs, aug comm device or speech skills. It has been especially useful to teach pronouns use. And it has been useful to increase sentence length of their comments.

Where: I have used this in children’s homes and in classroom setting with the children taking turns in a small group and commenting on what they see or suggesting things to the current person touching the iPad.

How:
This app has scenes with a variety of cause and effect actions that occur when you touch the various characters.

I have used this as a object search with the “What’s Up” feature to have children visually search the scene for the specific picture activated.

This app is also good to pair with toy cars and a doll house to act out the actions on the iPad with the toys.

Submitted by: Jennifer Chapman Simms M.Ed

Additional ideas/comments:
This app has been engaging for variety of child to learn persistence in searching for specific features, and to be a conversation tool.

The free features have so many application possibilities that I have not yet purchased the extra scenes.
Free

in App
purchase of other scenes available.
external image images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRUZhGVi_OXCcpsoqZ_vGltwh-EOaQ070dGPHHdUGaf58rSlx02Fw
Toddler’s Seek & Find Picture Book: My Animals
What: This app has two visual scenes in the free version. There is a farm scene and a zoo scene. Each picture has a large variety of points on the scene that activate the characters. There is a feature called "whats up" where you click on the picture in a choice board format and it activates that picture back in the scene.

This Who: This app and the related app My Little Town works well with preschools and toddlers with emerging fine motor finger isolation. I have used it to work on reaching around the screen and following my directions of find the …. It has also been useful to work on commenting for children with their signs, aug comm device or speech skills. It has been useful to teach pronouns use. And it has been useful to increase sentence length of their comments. I have used it with a few children learning to navigate their aug comm device to request a specific animal or pair the nouns (cat, tractor, camel, elephant) with the actions (stands, drives, spits, baths).

Where: I have used this in children’s homes and in classroom setting with the children taking turns in a small group and commenting on what they see or suggesting things to the current person touching the iPad.

How:
This app has scenes with a variety of cause and effect actions that occur when you touch the various characters.

I have used this as a object search with the “What’s Up” feature to have children visually search the scene for the specific picture activated.

This app is also good to pair with toy animals to act out the actions from the iPad with the toys.


Submitted by: Jennifer Chapman Simms M.Ed

Additional ideas/comments:
The free features have so many application possibilities that I have not yet purchased the extra scenes.

There is background music that can be turned off. There is also a piglet that farts but this too can be turned off.

You can swipe to move between the scenes.
Free


in App

purchase of other scenes available.